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A young woman becomes worried about her boyfriend when he explores a dark subculture surrounding a mysterious videotape said to kill the watcher seven days after he has viewed it.
The incredible untold story of Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson - brilliant African-American women working at NASA, who served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit.
Every payday, garbage collector Troy Maxson (Denzel Washington) holds court in the backyard of the Pittsburgh home he shares with his wife, Rose (Viola Davis) and their son, Cory (Jovan Adepo). By Troy’s side are his two best friends, Bono (Stephen Henderson), the co-worker he’s known for decades, and a bottle of gin, which Troy has also known for decades.
"Rogue One: A Star Wars Story" promised a work in the vein of "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "The Magnificent Seven" and "The Dirty Dozen"—impossible mission movies that weren't afraid to kill off the vivid characters they created. This film about a band of misfits stealing the plans to the first Death Star is that kind of work.
Jason Bateman as Josh Parker Olivia Munn as Tracey Hughes T.J. Miller as Clay Vanstone Kate McKinnon as Mary Jillian Bell as Trina Vanessa Bayer as Allison Courtney B. Vance as Walter Davis Rob Corddry as Jeremy Randall Park as Fred Da'Vine Joy Randolph as Carla Director Josh Gordon Will Speck Writer Justin Malen Laura Solon Dan Mazer Writer (story) Jon Lucas Scott Moore Timothy Dowling Cinematographer Jeff Cutter Editor Jeff Groth Evan Henke Composer Theodore Shapiro Comedy Rated R for crude sexual content and language throughout, drug use and graphic nudity. 105 minutes | Susan Wloszczyna December 9, 2016 | Print Page Let’s be generous to “Office Christmas Party” and note that its two directors (whose resume includes “Blades of Glory” and a short-lived sitcom based on the GEICO caveman ads) and six writers (among them, a Borat enabler and the two guys who created “The Hangover”) were onto something when they tapped into our nation’s growing pushback against political correctness.
While it may not quite be the modern-day “Casablanca,” it is nevertheless a grandly entertaining stab at old-fashioned storytelling (albeit with levels of sex, violence and profanity that they could never have gotten away with back in the day) buoyed by smart and stylish filmmaking, a good performance by Brad Pitt and an even better one from Marion Cotillard.
Ah, distractions. Be it with junk food or Netflix binges, many are craving safe havens away from post-election fallout these days. But what we really need are the right distractions, ones that lift spirits, engage minds, delight eyes and don’t pander to our baser instincts, including those alarming posts that dribble down social media feeds, stirring up unease about the future.